Thursday, October 25, 2007

Dialog between wind and bike

42An accountant and an economist once walked down a dirt road, along the banks of a crick. The accountant saw a frog, and did offer the economist $20,000 to eat it. So the economist ate the frog, and the accountant did verily pay him. 43Another half hour down the road the economist saw a frog. He offered the accountant $20,000 to eat the frog, and, yea, they agreed and fulfilled their contract. 44The accountant thus said unto the economist, 45"We have now our original sums of money, and we have both eaten frogs. We are no better off than before." 46The economist paused and wisely intoned, 47"Only if you neglect that we have engaged in $40,000 of trade"

(The competing currents of thought underlying this dialog, which I found in a much less pretentious form on a web page full of "profession" jokes, also underly my thinking about many things lately. Yes.)

3 comments:

Danielle in Iowa said...

I just thought it was funny...

Al Dimond said...

See, and you should keep on thinking that it's funny, because it is! It's not really about anomie or whatever, it's about, you know, eating frogs.

There's also an accountant joke that touches on the pleasure, nay, joy, we often take in menial routine. Perhaps the vehicle for the observation is a light-hearted jab at accountancy, whose image embodies this characteristic perhaps most out of all professions, but we can see ourselves all in the accountant in the joke.

Now I bet you wonder what the joke is.

Well I'm not telling.

Aaron Sheldon said...

-- I WILL SPOIL AL'S SECRET JOKE --

A very successful partner is a big six firm had a peculiar habit. He will go to his desk open a locked drawer, look inside, lock the drawer again, and start his work. His subordinates knew that he hid the secret of his success in the drawer, they waited for the opportunity. One day when the partner had gone out of the city, the juniors decided to make a break. They broke into the drawer, breathlessly, and looked inside. There was one small piece of paper inside - it said - "left is debit and right is credit."